Journey into German Genealogy Lecture Video and Handouts

Whether you are just starting out in German genealogy or have some research under your belt,  this lecture is a must-see. Originally filmed in Andover, Massachusetts, this presentation is 1 hour  in length and includes:

  1. Where to look for records in the USA, including resources for:
    1. Vital records
    2. Church records
    3. Newspapers
    4. Passenger lists 
    5. And more!
  2. Tips for crossing the pond and finding the above records in Europe
  3. Resources for locating your ancestor’s hometown
  4. German and Austrian church record sites
  5. Tips on first names and last names
  6. Tips on reading the old German handwriting (recognizing certain letters, differentiating between similar letters, common spelling mistakes, genealogy abbreviations, occupation tips, etc.)
  7. And much more!

With this lecture, you will receive the link to the video, as well as two handouts complete with numerous website and book resources (Handout 1), a German handwriting key and a short excerpt of German handwriting practice (Handout 2).

Reviews of Journey into German Genealogy Lecture

“With a lack of robust German census records available to most researchers, it’s nice to take a look at alternative records. Genealogy researcher and translator Katherine Schober has uploaded a fantastic video appropriate for beginning and intermediate genealogists online for free. She’s a great presenter, and I hope she updates her YouTube page with more videos in the future!” – Fountaindale Public LIbrary, on video upload of “Journey into German Genealogy” Presentation

“Katherine presented an engaging program about researching German ancestry at the public library in Andover, MA.  She drew a large crowd and held their attention with her deep knowledge of German history and  culture.  Her genuine enthusiasm for researching German ancestry and deciphering old handwritten German documents is what made her presentation so enjoyable. I’ve had several patrons request that I invite her back.”  — Stephanie Aude, Genealogy and Local History Librarian, Memorial Hall Library, Andover, Massachusetts

“Katherine’s advice on websites and other resources for getting started in German genealogy was straightforward and very helpful in targeting the most useful places to begin your search.  Likewise, she provided numerous tips, tricks and shortcuts for deciphering that difficult German handwriting with lots of instructive class exercises.”  — Gina, Colorado Palatines to America, Denver, Colorado 

 

Birth, Marriage and Death Certificate Reference Guide Package: Major Savings!

Have you found a German birth, marriage or death certificate for your ancestor but don’t know what it says? If so, these translation cheat sheets are for you. Rather than  try and translate each individual printed word of these vital records to see what genealogical clues they can offer, use this finished version to fill in the blanks. These  templates, translated personally by Katherine Schober, a professional translator well-versed in historical and genealogical  vocabulary, will save you both time and money when deciphering information on your ancestor. Don’t miss out on this major time-saver in your genealogy research – get yours now.

After completing your  purchase, you will receive an e-mail with the downloadable English translation and German transcription of the certificate. Don’t forget to check your spam folder if you do not immediately see it in your inbox. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact me here.

 

Birth Certificate Reference Guide

Have you found a German birth, marriage or death certificate for your ancestor but don’t know what it says? If so, these translation cheat sheets are for you. Rather than  try and translate each individual printed word of these vital records to see what genealogical clues they can offer, use this finished version to fill in the blanks. These  templates, translated personally by Katherine Schober, a professional translator well-versed in historical and genealogical  vocabulary, will save you both time and money when deciphering information on your ancestor. Don’t miss out on this major time-saver in your genealogy research – get yours now.

After completing your  purchase, you will receive an e-mail with the downloadable English translation and German transcription of the certificate. Don’t forget to check your spam folder if you do not immediately see it in your inbox. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact me here.

Marriage Certificate Reference Guide

Have you found a German birth, marriage or death certificate for your ancestor but don’t know what it says? If so, these translation cheat sheets are for you. Rather than  try and translate each individual printed word of these vital records to see what genealogical clues they can offer, use this finished version to fill in the blanks. These  templates, translated personally by Katherine Schober, a professional translator well-versed in historical and genealogical  vocabulary, will save you both time and money when deciphering information on your ancestor. Don’t miss out on this major time-saver in your genealogy research – get yours now.

After completing your  purchase, you will receive an e-mail with the downloadable English translation and German transcription of the certificate. Don’t forget to check your spam folder if you do not immediately see it in your inbox. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact me here.

Death Certificate Reference Guide

Have you found a German birth, marriage or death certificate for your ancestor but don’t know what it says? If so, these translation cheat sheets are for you. Rather than  try and translate each individual printed word of these vital records to see what genealogical clues they can offer, use this finished version to fill in the blanks. These  templates, translated personally by Katherine Schober, a professional translator well-versed in historical and genealogical  vocabulary, will save you both time and money when deciphering information on your ancestor. Don’t miss out on this major time-saver in your genealogy research – get yours now.

After completing your  purchase, you will receive an e-mail with the downloadable English translation and German transcription of the certificate. Don’t forget to check your spam folder if you do not immediately see it in your inbox. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact me here.

In Search of Your German Roots by Angus Baxter

This edition of In Search of Your German Roots is designed to help you trace your German ancestry, not only in Germany, but in all the German-speaking areas of Europe, from the Baltic to the Crimea, from the Czech Republic to Belgium. It shows you how to conduct your research from your own home–at your computer, using a variety of online resources and also points you to the most useful repositories of records abroad.

When the first edition of this book was published in 1987, searching for German ancestors was a more cumbersome and likely more expensive proposition. A lot of legwork was required in order to pinpoint what records were available in Germany and where they were housed, letters had to be written and fees paid, followed up by weeks of waiting for responses. Today, all of the major archives and many of the smaller ones, as well as church parishes, have websites containing contact information and information on their holdings; many have put digitized images of their records online. Correspondence can usually now be handled more quickly and less expensively via e-mail. An ever increasing number of searchable databases with information relevant to German ancestor-hunters, passenger lists, vital records, censuses, cemetery records, surname directories, etc. has greatly improved opportunities for research.

The fifth edition of the book highlights all of the recent developments–new facilities, new websites, newly available records–that have made German family history research immeasurably easier. 

German-English Genealogical Dictionary by Ernest Thode

This book is designed for the family researcher who has little or no knowledge of German but who nevertheless needs to make a translation of German-language documents. The dictionary covers thousands of German terms and defines them in single words or brief phrases. All words, symbols, and abbreviations in the dictionary were chosen on the basis of their association with genealogy, having been noted in church records, civil registration records, family correspondence, genealogical journals, ships’ passenger lists, and emigration records.

Among the many categories of entries included in the dictionary are family relationships, days of the week, map terms, legal terms, cardinal and ordinary numbers, roman numerals, signs of the zodiac, coins, liquid and dry measures, measures of length, place names, historical territories, geographical terms, occupations, titles, military ranks, types of taxes, illnesses, calendar days, male and female given names, heraldry, abbreviations, books of the Bible, and common genealogical words from Danish, Dutch, French, Latin, and Polish.

In conjunction with a standard German-English dictionary, the user of this work should be able to make a word-by-word translation of any German document and understand it.